Dan Pacholke: How prisons can help inmates live meaningful lives

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Dan Pacholke is a long-time officer, and served as the administrator of the Washington State Department of Corrections. In February 2016, he resigned as a secretary of the State Corrections, hoping that the resignation meets the Republican lawmaker’s need for blood.

For more than 15 years, Pacholke has been an advocate of improving life in prison. He is the co-founder of the project Sustainability in Prisons. Unofficially, the project started in 2003, when he implemented some initiatives involving correctional staff and prisoners. Some of the activities involved recycling, organic garden, beekeeping and many more.

The goal was to support the prison’s food services, as well as lessen the financial and environmental impacts of prison facilities. In his TED talk, Pacholke talks about the beginnings of the Sustainability in Prisons project. In an era where we are concerned about sustainability, and we are trying to find new and new sources of food and energy, his idea is revolutionary.

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