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29:32
Supersense
Supersense

457 Views 0 Comments 29:32

You are starting a journey to a world of senses other than your own… We experience life through the five main senses, but even these are better developed in some animals known. Smell your way across an ocean as salmon do. See through the eyes of various aspects of a fly, which is a human hand when he is about to attack. Amazing effects reveal the secrets of animal perception.Episode 1: The Sixth Sense The animals use their senses of human beings who are unaware. Sensitivity to electromagnetic fields of the earth, or time pressure, can be used to aid navigation. Some animals can predict earthquakes. Predators to put these non-lethal ways to use: a shark in the homes of the electricity of the body of its prey, the vampire bats detect infrared radiation from the blood, a rattlesnake and see a picture of the warmth of his victim.Episode 2: The sense view A vulture can detect a carcass from a great distance, four-eyed fish can see above and below the water at the same time, a fly’s multifaceted eye sees a world very different from a human eye, while other insects can see ultraviolet light. And the Lions have an area of the retina that, in fact empathize with their prey.Episode 3: The sense of sound The human ear is limited in scope and are deaf to record a conversation or the elephant under pitched squealing mice. Whales use sound to communicate over hundreds of miles of ocean, while the spiders while listening to the beating of wings of the dam and the kangaroo rat has a sensitive ear can hear strike rattlesnake – and avoid . Birds, in turn, use sound to detect changes in climate and as an aid to navigation. Episode 4: Super Scents The smell is very useful in hunting, protection of a species, mating … and navigation. Petrels use it to find fish in the open sea, springbok issue a “warning” the smell of the herd as an indicator of a predator, salamanders, females inject their aphrodisiac, and epic journey of a salmon in the sea to spawn and die is achieved through their sense of smell.Episode 5: timing Courtship, egg laying, hibernation … The cycles of the earth, moon and sun are the rhythms that govern life. The perception of all animals of time varies according to your heart rate.A shrew lives 30 times faster than an elephant, so the time seems to pass more slowly. Also shown is a rare eruption of 17 years of U.S. cricket.Episode 6: Making Sense The end of the film shows how each animal has a unique view of the world derives from a combination of different senses.The mind creates mental maps of navigational skills, which can also be affected by genetic programming. Other super-senses are the result of the need to hunt or avoid being eaten. The mind decides what skills you need to survive.

44:18
The Disappearing Male
The Disappearing Male

313 Views 0 Comments 44:18

‘The disappearing male’ highlights a disturbing trend focusing on how the foundation of human development is threatened by toxic substances found in everything from shampoo, sunglasses, meat and dairy products, carpet, cosmetics and baby bottles, called “hormone mimicking” or “endocrine disrupting” chemicals, which are damaging the male reproductive system.The fact that the last few decades have seen steady and dramatic increases in the incidence of boys and young men suffering from genital deformities, low sperm count, sperm abnormalities and testicular cancer along with ADHD, autism, Tourette’s syndrome, cerebral palsy, and dyslexia, is a living testimony to the dangers posed to the human species.The presence of these toxic substances is present in all seemingly harmless looking products that we use daily and doctors and researchers are increasingly getting wary of this issue.

59:05
The Incredible Human Journey
The Incredible Human Journey

256 Views 0 Comments 59:05

This documentary goes into the very early history of our species. We all came from a relatively close region in Africa yet we soon spread all across the globe. This documentary goes into the reasons why we moved and how we did it.

41:14
The Death of the Oceans – BBC Horizon
The Death of the Oceans – BBC Horizon

252 Views 0 Comments 41:14

One gets the feeling that the decision to frame the title of The Death of the oceans? as a matter may have been taken in the last minute in order to discourage immediate despair by the viewer.If the program itself communicated anything, however, is that the oceans dead are much stronger possibility that the question mark means.The threat, in fact, seems to be immediate and almost irreversible. One scientist said: We run the risk of loss of species before it has even been introduced to them. The sea life is very fragile, said another. Not for one minute think that we can not screw up much worse than it is today.No sound down, it looked like another documentary lush and luxurious sea creatures led by David Attenborough, looking weird humpback whale squid and shining in the sun.But the soundtrack was mostly a long list of warnings raw and grim statistics: fish in our seas clean for the year 2050, all corals to die because of ocean acidification unless the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere is drastically reduced, all conversations eventually whale drowned our shipping increasingly noisy.Before we can take the most basic measures to save our oceans, we need something we’ve never come close to having: a baseline study of what is in the sea. That’s where people diligently Census of Marine Life comes in.They are carefully measuring all aspects of ocean life, although it is difficult to see that they do in present circumstances no one would pretend that bit faster. Dr. Julian Caley and his team spend months examining the creatures in a cubic foot coral reef in Australia.The worm only specialist found 22 new species. Records of parasites of fish type, on average, one new species a day, 6,000 species have been discovered previously unknown through the census of all so far.Filmed by BBC Horizons –http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00v7tmd

10:25
The Extinction of The Siberian Tiger
The Extinction of The Siberian Tiger

225 Views 0 Comments 10:25

This remarkable documentary follows the story of an adult female Siberian tiger named Katia and her cub for a birthday. Their travel route takes us to the remote part of Russia. Unfortunately, on their journey, they will be drawn into a conflict with humans.This beautiful species once roamed from eastern Russia to South Korea, but the damage inflicted on the population by poaching and the destruction of their natural habitat resulted in the decrease in population with only a couple of hundred Siberian tigers left in this vast terrain.Katia and her cub are travelling through the Sikhote Alin Biosphere Reserve, which represents the core of the tiger dwellings. This sanctuary, located in the Eastern Russia, is the last breeding ground for the Siberian tigers. It is also the largest wildlife sanctuary in Russia. The purpose of this documentary is to raise awareness about the decline of this amazing species and hopefully make a change for the better. The extinction is a near future for this animal, unless something is done to prevent it.

01:29:55
Ape to Man
Ape to Man

198 Views 0 Comments 01:29:55

It has long been considered the most pressing issue of our history: Where did humans come from? Although life has existed for millions of years, only in the past century and a half we have begun to use science to explore the ancestral roots of our own species.The search for the ultimate answer has taken a series of twists and turns, with careers made and broken on the road. Ape to man is the story of the quest to find the origins of the human race – a quest that spanned more than 150 years of obsessive searching Searching for the origins of mankind is a history of bone and feature stories .It was in 1856 that the first bones of extinct human ancestor were encountered, discovered by a team of unskilled workers to excavate the limestone in Western Europe. The finding, to be known as Neanderthal Man, was seeing the light of day for the first time in more than 40,000 years.At that time, the concept of a previous human species was virtually unthinkable. However, only a few years later, the work of Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species first broached the subject of evolution, and by the end of the nineteenth century had become the hottest topic of the day.Adventurers had embarked on the search for the missing link, the only creature that represents the evolutionary leap from apes to humans. Ape to Man examines the major discoveries that have led to the understanding we have today, including theories that never gained full acceptance of his time, an elaborate hoax that confused the scientific community for years, and understanding short of the key elements that separate man from apes.

15:01
The Ape That Took Over The World
The Ape That Took Over The World

152 Views 0 Comments 15:01

In 2001, scientists announced a startling discovery: the oldest skull of a human ancestor ever found. The fossil of three million and a half old, was very complete, and finding fossils unlike any before. Their discovery – by a team led by Meave Leakey of the famous Leakey fossil-hunting family – has revolutionized our understanding of how humans evolved.The great mystery of our evolution is like a monkey could have evolved into extraordinary creature is a human being. There has never been another animal on the planet like us. And yet, tens of millions of years there was no sign that humans would take over the world. Instead of the Earth was dominated by apes. Over 50 different species of apes roamed the world – ten million years the Earth was actually the planet of the apes. Three million years later, most had disappeared. In its place came something clearly related to the apes, but also completely different human beings!Brainy or bipedal? For years, scientists searched for the first key feature that allowed us to make the leap from ape to human being amazing. At first they thought that the development of our large brains was decisive. They even found the fossils seemed to prove it, until he reached the famous fossil Lucy three million years old skeleton. This overturned the big brain theory, because here was a human ancestor that walked on two legs clearly, like us, but his little brain of a monkey. It seemed that the development of walking on two legs (bipedalism) was the first key feature human, which put us on the path to becoming human.Lucy soon became even more important. She seemed to defy the laws of evolution. Typically, more an evolutionary adaptation, such as walking on two legs is followed by what scientists call adaptive radiation. Many related species rapidly evolve from an initial evolutionary innovation. It gives a very thick family evolutionary tree, with many different species, but related. Scientists knew that the human branch of the family tree had started about six or seven million years ago when the planet of the apes over. And yet no sign of an adaptive radiation. The family tree showed only a straight line from the Planet of the Apes by Lucy. (Excerpt from bbc.co.uk)

01:16
Deep Sea
Deep Sea

148 Views 0 Comments 01:16

The beauty and mystery of life beneath the surface of the ocean is brought to the screen in this documentary, shot in 3-D and exhibited in the form of high-definition IMAX film. Shot in the deep ocean off the coast of Baja California, the Caribbean, and North Carolina, deep sea represents the complexity of underwater ecosystems, as some sea creatures live in cooperation while others feed weaker species to survive.Filmmaker Howard Hall also focuses on the splendor of this world rarely seen by human eyes, photographing a number of rare species of fish, squid, rays, jellyfish and other aquatic creatures as well as offering a perspective on environmental hazards that threaten the underwater community. Johnny Depp and Kate Winslet provide the narration of the film.

49:13
Galapagos
Galapagos

146 Views 0 Comments 49:13

Follow the filmmakers from the Smithsonian Institute on a visual journey through the lush paradise of the Pacific Ocean that is home to some of the flora and fauna on the planet’s most precious. Scattered throughout Ecuador, this largely unexplored series of volcanic islands is home to an impressive array of endangered species are virtually unknown outside the archipelago.Darwin proposed his theory of evolution after contemplating changes in the bodies of birds and land animals isolated for thousands of years in the islands. But the real focal point of this film is beneath the waters of the islands, where Darwin was never explored.Because the currents flowing back and forth between the islands and mainland Ecuador, the evolutionary separation of sea creatures (compared with the inhabitants of the earth) has been dropped, but they are wonderful, however.

58:35
The Secret You
The Secret You

123 Views 0 Comments 58:35

With the help of a scientist who wields a hammer, Jennifer Aniston and general anesthesia, Professor Marcus du Sautoy is in search of answers to one of the greatest mysteries of science: how do we know who we are?While the thoughts that make us feel like we know ourselves are easy to use, which are very difficult to explain. Therefore, in order to find out where they come from, Marcus is subjected to a series of survey experiments.He learns how old our self-consciousness emerges and whether other species share this trait. Then have your mind scrambled for a cutting edge experiment in anesthesia.Having survived that test, Marcus is an experience out of the body in an attempt to locate his true self. And in Hollywood, he learns how celebrities are helping scientists to understand the microscopic activity of our brain.Finally, participates in a mind-reading experiment that both helps to explain and alter radically their understanding of who he is.

55:52
Search for the First Human (Sahelanthropus Tchadensis)
Search for the First Human (Sahelanthropus Tchadensis)

100 Views 0 Comments 55:52

Sahelanthropus tchadensis is one of the oldest known species in the human family tree.The species lived between 7 and 6 million years in western Central Africa (Chad). Upright walking may have helped the species survive in diverse habitats – including forests and grasslands.Despite having only Sahelanthropus skull material, studies so far indicates that primitive man was a combination of apelike traits and similarities to humans.Its features include a small brain monkey (although a little smaller than a chimpanzee!) Head bowed, very prominent brow ridges and elongated skull.Their human-like features include small canine teeth, a middle part of the face below, and an opening of the spinal cord below the skull rather than toward the rear, as well as in non-bipedal primates (or monkeys).How do we know Sahelanthropus walked upright? Some of the earliest evidence of walking on two legs is Sahelanthropus.The large opening (foramen magnum) into the base of the skull to the spinal cord connects the brain is placed below (the bottom of the skull) than in apes or any other primate except humans. This characteristic indicates that the head of Sahelanthropus was conducted in a body upright.

01:37
Living with Us
Living with Us

77 Views 0 Comments 01:37

Bronwen Parker-Rhodes captivating documentary Living With Us examines the special relationship between animals and their trainers, which offers a look at handling your unique link and close.Discreetly shot, the film looks closely at three animals patterns of behavior conditioning trainer with patience, skill and sensitivity.Much more to do wild things being coached in a less savage, living with us is a subtle and tender study of the interaction between species.