Discover Documentaries

Videos Tagged: brain

Explore Video Tags

01:33:04
The English Surgeon
The English Surgeon

1,392 Views 0 Comments 01:33:04

‘The English Surgeon’ is an award winning documentary film made by BBC based on the work of Henry Thomas Marsh, born in 1950, a leading British neurosurgeon, and a pioneer of neurosurgical progress in Ukraine.‘The English Surgeon’ is an award winning documentary film made by BBC based on the work of Henry Thomas Marsh, born in 1950, a leading British neurosurgeon, and a pioneer of neurosurgical progress in Ukraine.Marsh is a truly gifted brain surgeon, currently serving as a senior consultant neurosurgeon at the Atkinson Morley Wing at St George’s Hospital, one of the country’s largest specialist brain surgery units. He specialises in operating on the brain under local anesthesia and was also the subject of a major BBC documentary ‘Your Life in Their Hands’ in 2004, which won the Royal Television Society Gold Medal. He was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2010 Birthday Honours.This film delves deep into his personal life to find answers about his humanity, achievements, failures and the complex relationship he shares with his patients to surrender their lives in his hands. To help others in every possible was, Henry has been going out to Kyiv for over 15 years to help improve upon the medieval brain surgery he witnessed there during his first visit in 1992 and thus is deeply revered by his patients, colleagues and people desperate for some miracle to save their loved ones.

49:05
How Does Your Memory Work?
How Does Your Memory Work?

997 Views 0 Comments 49:05

One of the most interesting aspects to the human brain is the ability to remember, and more specifically beyond remembering language or shopping lists, to ‘travel’ back in time within your memory. How Does Your Memory Work? takes us on a trip through the brain, focusing on some unique people, including a man with no memory, and a women who is using pills to erase traumatic memories.With these stories, as well as with information provided by some of the world’s top memory researchers, we learn that memory develops early, but as time progresses some parts of memory can disappear. We also find out that our memory shapes who we are, including our personalities.

10:00
Psychopath
Psychopath

919 Views 0 Comments 10:00

There are many psychopaths in society, in fact, practically know nothing. These are not necessarily psychopaths who commit murder, commit acts of serious violence, or even come to the attention of the police. They can be successful entrepreneurs. They can be successful politicians. Research can be performed successfully. They can be priests success. There are in all areas of society. There is a growing awareness that psychopathic behavior is all around us in all areas of life.According to popular wisdom, psychopaths are serial murderers and bloodthirsty madman. Reality is not so simple. While many psychopaths do not commit violent crimes, not all psychopaths are criminals and not all criminals are psychopaths. Psychopaths are found in many aspects of life and are often successful in competitive professions. However it was also ruthless, manipulative and destructive. Equinox reports on techniques developed by psychologists to determine whether a person is psychopathic and shows how brain scientists are getting closer to mapping the malfunctions in the brain that causes a person to be a psychopath. In Britain, one person in 200 is probably a psychopath. However, psychopaths are thought to be responsible for half of all reported crimes, which represent between 15% and 20% of the prison population.The program analyzes the latest research on brain and behavior of psychopaths and assesses the prospects for the treatment or containment of this antisocial group of people who create a disproportionate amount of destruction. Psychopaths who have been convicted of heinous crimes to clearly explain what motivated his behavior disturbing violent and destructive. They speak without shame, guilt, remorse or empathy for their victims.Though articulate and, at times, plausible and charming, they lack the range of emotions experienced by the rest of society. They know the difference between good and evil, but not sorry. Robert Hare, professor of psychology at the University of Vancouver, has devised a system of assessment called the Psychopathy Checklist. Specialized In interviews, psychologists assess individuals on a scale of 0 to 40 for a series of character traits, including callousness, superficial charm, lack of empathy and many others (for more details on How to recognize a psychopath ). Anyone whose score is greater than 26 were diagnosed as psychotic.

49:12
The Human Body
The Human Body

549 Views 2 Comments 49:12

This astonishing series takes us on a breathtaking journey turns the most complex biological mechanism on earth – the human body.Using a technique that allows us to see changes in time photos, graphics, technical drawing and illustration software calculated to investigate any act, due to a corner of the human body at different stages of growth, maturity and the final state – decay.Tuition, girls, pains of adolescence, the complex activity of the brain and eventually death is shown in steps with a detailed explanation.Offering a clear voice of Dr. Robert Winston allows a 10-year-old child, even to acquire knowledge and understand the human body like never before.Life Story – Every second, a world of miraculous microscopic events take place within the body.A daily miracle – The drama of conception activates the machine most sophisticated life support on earth.First Steps – In four years, the newborn child learns all the skills of survival.Raging Teens – The hormone-driven roller coaster known as adolescence!Brain Power – The adult human brain is the most complicated – object in the universe – and mysterious.As Time Goes By – is much more complex – and fascinating – simple reduction.The end of life – even in death, the body reveals remarkable secrets.

49:51
Human Senses
Human Senses

464 Views 0 Comments 49:51

Almost everyone has experienced a moment a faint fragrance brings back memories of a moment lost in time so hit back to the forefront of their minds.Often we have forgotten the entire event, but is aware of our mind presented clearly unfathomable in some inaccessible corner of the brain, ready for instant retrieval.Nigel Marven goes in search of unpleasant odors and more attractive, is to discover why they are great to see some things, but sometimes miss what is before our eyes, the biological reasons why humans eat a wide range of food, raw ducks rotten eggs a sweaty blue cheese, shows that when it comes to our sense of human touch are like elephants, keeps track of the sounds they produce more powerful emotional impact about us and joins stunt coordinator Marc Cass for a dramatic unity and experience as the organs of balance, let us know how we’re being a jerk around and even upside down.Specialty real human beings is to check each other. We are very good at it, we do it without even being aware of it. With the help of the latest eye-tracking technology and scientists from the University of Sussex, committed volunteers are what your eyes really catch up. We are also very experienced in measuring the depth and distance. Nigel discover how the best players in baseball to manage the monitoring of a ball coming toward them at high speed. This ability is an extreme example of the basic hand / eye coordination that we all acquire as we grow.

09:54
BrainSex: Why We Fall in Love?
BrainSex: Why We Fall in Love?

361 Views 0 Comments 09:54

BrainSex – Why we fall in love, is an interesting documentary about the science and the natural results of why humans fall in love.For centuries, love has been celebrated – and tried – mostly by poets, artists and singers of ballads. But now, its mysteries have also occurred in the tools of science, including modern brain-scanning machines.A handful of young people who had just fallen madly in love with volunteers for their brains scanned to see which areas are activated when they saw a photo of your girlfriend. The brain areas that lit up were precisely those that are known to be rich in a powerful good chemical dopamine – the substance the release of brain cells in response to cocaine and nicotine.Dopamine is the key chemical in the brain’s reward system, a network of cells associated with pleasure – and addiction.In the same laboratory, older volunteers who said he was still deeply in love after two decades of marriage participated in the experiment itself. Same brain areas lit up, showing that at least some lucky couples, the honeymoon feeling can last.But in these people, other lighted areas, too – to the rich of oxytocin, the chemical that helps new mothers to embrace the milk and the bond with their babies, is secreted by both sexes during orgasm and, in animals has been associated with monogamy and long-term attachment.It is too soon – and hopefully, always will be – to say that brain scientists have been translated into all warm and fuzzy feelings we call romantic love in a lot of chemicals and electrical signals in the brain.But they have a plausible hypothesis, that dopamine plays an important role in the excitement of love, and oxytocin is key to calmer experience of attachment. Of course, the data are preliminary. But the results so far are provocative.

51:52
The Brain: Our Universe Within
The Brain: Our Universe Within

358 Views 0 Comments 51:52

Forty years ago, the American anthropologist Dr. Ralph Selecki explored the caves of Shanidar, where he discovered an old man’s image that profoundly changed the way we saw our ancestors.The professor discovered a skull – a Neanderthal skull. Interestingly, it was covered with microscopic pollen from the flowers of thistle, ragwort, Spiraea and mauve, among others.The same pollen dust covered the rest of the skeletal elements, suggesting that family and friends had gathered deliberately and laid flowers in clusters in the body.These mourners left behind the earliest known signs of man’s consciousness of death. Based on the findings of Dr. Selecki, Neanderthals seemed to have what we have come to call to mind.Deeply complex and mysterious, the human brain is an odyssey in itself. Making this journey into the inner workings of the mind under the guidance of scientist Dr. David Suzuki, host of the Discovery Channel documentary fascinating.This series explores how the brain develops from birth to adulthood, how memory works, how humans recovering from a brain injury, and the origins of creativity and identity.

03:17
What Makes a Genius?
What Makes a Genius?

277 Views 0 Comments 03:17

Could have come with the theory of relativity of Einstein? If not – why not? This is what Marcus du Sautoy, a mathematics professor, wants to explore.Marcus admits that he is not a genius, but genius wants to know if they are simply an extreme version of himself – or if their brains are fundamentally different.Marcus meets some remarkable individuals – Tommy, an obsessive artist uses all his house as his canvas, Derek: blind, autistic, and a pianist with prodigious gifts apparently, Claire who is also blind, but whose brain has learned to see with sound.Marcus shows how babies have the remarkable ability that most of us lose in adolescence. He meets a neurologist who claims to have evidence of innate ability, a scientist who has identified a gene for learning, and Dr. Paulus, who has figured out how to sharpen the brain … by turbo-charging electrically.

19:55
Secrets of The Mind
Secrets of The Mind

263 Views 0 Comments 19:55

The mind is a heavily studied yet mystery filled thing. We have spent many years studying the most complex organ that we have and yet we still have mysteries. Secrets of The Mind follows renowned neuroscientist Vilayanur S. Ramachandran who explores various patients with odd brain disorders. This documentary is a truly interesting one, as the mind and its mysteries are truly enthralling.

59:05
What Makes Us Human?
What Makes Us Human?

196 Views 0 Comments 59:05

Our behavior is actually more than a matter of animal instinct? Of gorillas using sign language to make obscene suggestions pinheader people who can not use the language at all, the pigs learn to Hoover and the sheep who fall in love, this series explores what really distinguishes us from the beasts .Evolutionary scientist Dr. Armand Leroi explores how and why he became a man, but instead of looking for clues in ancient fossils, looking for rarities, aberrations and mutations that surrounds us today.What separates us from our animal cousins and makes us essentially human? For centuries, philosophers and archaeologists have asked this question, but at a fundamental level responses have been a mystery until now.Having argued that the essential difference between ape and man is the big smart brain, Dr. Armand Leroi explores how the special qualities of the brain have allowed us to dominate the planet.

00:34
Poison In The Mouth
Poison In The Mouth

164 Views 0 Comments 00:34

Poison in the Mouth’ is a startling documentary revealing lesser known facts about the dangers Mercury can pose.It shows Mercury used in Silver amalgam can cause brain damage when proper precautions are not taken by dentists while removing or replacing them for fillings in the teeth.So if anyone gets it done from an unqualified dentist, it can cause a relapse or an equivalent of over 10 year’s mercury exposure in a single sitting.It is advised that alternatives like ceramic fillings can be used to replace the filling material and also, proper detoxification of the body should be undergone to rid the body of the massive amount of mercury absorption that can happen during extraction.The film shows and explains the detailed guidelines provided by The IAOMT in this regard.

10:01
The Virtual Revolution
The Virtual Revolution

138 Views 0 Comments 10:01

In this documentary Dr Aleks Krotoski looks at how 20 years after the invention of the World Wide Web, every aspect of our lives is being influenced.The web’s biggest names – including the founders of Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, Apple and Microsoft, and the web’s inventor have joined her to explore how far the web has lived up to its early promise.The founding father of the Web, Tim Berners-Lee, believed his invention would remain an open frontier that could not be owned by anybody and that it would take power from the few and give it to the many.In a provocative, strongly designed argument, Aleks Krotoski re-assesses unverified claims like these, made over many years by the torch bearers of the digital revolution – and test them against the hard realities of the emerging Web today, exploring how the possibilities of the pure technology have not only been constrained but even distorted by the limitations of human nature.Aleks maps out an ongoing clash between the freedom the technology offers us, and our inherent desire to control and and make money, by charting the unexpected rise of blogs, Wikipedia and YouTube in the first of this four part series, The Great LevellingWith contributions from Al Gore, Martha Lane Fox, Stephen Fry and Bill Gates, Aleks explores how interactive, unmediated sites like Twitter and YouTube have encouraged direct action and politicised young people in unparalleled numbers in the second part, Enemy of the StateIn the third part, The Cost of Free, she tells the inside story of the dotcom bubble and reveals how retailers such as Amazon learned the lessons. She also traces how, Google forged the business model that has come to dominate today’s web, offering a mind boggling range of highly attractive, overtly free web services, including search, maps and video, that are in fact funded through a sophisticated and highly lucrative advertising system which trades on what the users look for.Joined by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, Al Gore and the neuroscientist Susan Greenfield, Aleks examines the popularity of social networks such as Facebook in the last part of this series, Homo Interneticus, and comments on how they are changing our relationships. And, Aleks investigates how the Web may be distracting and overloading our brains in a ground-breaking test at University College London.

09:59
Stress: Portrait of a Killer
Stress: Portrait of a Killer

99 Views 0 Comments 09:59

Prolonged, sustained stress, excessive, and the similar response to that not only causes a deterioration in his brain, but also compromises your immune system’s ability to fight disease.Thousands of years ago, most of whom lived to be starved, were poisoned accidentally or were eaten by another animal. Now, we have the distinct ability to kill slowly over a period of 80 years tied chemical foods, too much alcohol and prolonged reaction to stressful situations. All are preventable if we take the decision to do so.Unfortunately, most people who really need the information in this document do not see it, and he sees that most ignore it. Only those who are determined to live a quality life for as long as possible to pay attention to this video.Today, 1 in 4 of us will die in a state of dementia or Alzheimer’s. If you want to increase your chances of that happening, then watch this video, watch it to see several times and invest in a program scientifically proven brain fitness.