Latest Articles In History

The present day term is derived from the Greek word “historia”, meaning inquiry or knowledge acquired by investigation. As a science it is concerned with the events that happened in the past. History preserves memory of these events, deals with the discovery of the past ones, collects and organizes them in a chronological fashion. The 5th century Greek historian Herodotus is today commonly recognized as the “father of history” along with his contemporary Thucydides.

As the result of the evolution of the science of history, different branches emerged with the purpose of thoroughly examining specific aspects of history such as religion, gender, military, environment, etc.

Since the 20th century there has been an ongoing debate concerned with the views on history. Some of the French historians associated with the Annales School argued that is a form of art, while others such as Fernand Braudel regarded it more as a social science. Contrary to these interpretations were the ones of the Marxist historians, who worked on the validation of Carl Marx`s theories. A somewhat different perspective on the matter was offered by the feminist historians such as Joan Wallach Scott or Claudia Koons considering the importance of studying the experience of women in the past.

The documentaries and video materials complied in this category are concerned with the matters of history and the factors that had influence on its very course.

Today we are celebrating Halloween by carving pumpkins and encouraging our children to dress up in scary costumes and go from door to door on a hunt for candy. See the ghoulish past of this holiday and learn about the origins of it.

See the new archeological evidence in support of the theory that a devastating Tsunami swept the eastern coast of Britain some 8000 years ago. Tony Robinson and his team examine the newfound evidence and also make a few discoveries of their own.

Learn about the French revolution and take a look at the course of events that lead to the execution of the last Queen of France, Marie Antoinette. It was a highly turbulent time for the entire France and a very violent one as well.

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Onna-bugeisha – The Female Samurai Warriors Were Just as Strong as Male

The history of Onna-bugeisha dates long before the samurai. In fact, even before the emergence of samurai, Japanese fighters were trained to wield a sword and a spear. Women, on the other hand, learne...

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Cinnamon – The Oldest Known Spice

ack in Ancient Egypt, people used cinnamon in their embalming mixtures, and it was also used by Moses as an anointing oil

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Vasco da Gama Facts You Do Not Learn in School

His discoveries were made possible after a few years earlier, Bartolomeu Dias found out that the Atlantic and the Indian Ocean were connected. That paved the way for explorers to go to India and other...

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Genghis Khan War Tactics – How he Built the Mongol Empire

In 25 short years, Genghis Khan and his army conquered more lands and people than the Roman Empire did during 400-year rule

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The Decameron – The Medical Significance Outweighs the Sexual Obscenity

The plot of the book is set in Italy during the time of the Black Death (a plague resulting in deaths of 75 to 200 million people across Europe and Asia). During the plague, a group of seven young wom...

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Excalibur – The Myth, The Legend, and Modern Version

There are two legends regarding the origin of the Excalibur. The first one is the most famous legend regarding the sword, originally appearing in Robert de Boron’s poem Merlin

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Troy – The Real City and the Legend

In the legend of Troy, Homer writes about a war between Greece and Troy. The war started after the abduction of Helen, a queen from Sparta. The abduction was done by Paris, son of King Priam, the rule...

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What is in Vatican Secret Archives?

The central repository in the Vatican City, the archives contain the state papers, correspondence, papal account books, and many other documents the church has accumulated over the centuries

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Roman dodecahedra – The Enigma Resolved

Embellished with a series of knobs on each corner point of the pentagon, there are more than 100 of these objects found in areas that have been part of the Roman Empire

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How women got into the military? A timeline of events

The fight for the right to serve in the military started back during the revolutionary war

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Remembering Nellie Bly – The pioneer of Investigative Journalism

Nellie laid the groundwork of investigative journalism when worked undercover as a patient in a mental institution

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Did Keno Really Build the Great Wall of China?

According to a legend, a ruler in Ancient China invented the game of Keno, and used the money to fund the Great Wall of China

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Life in Ancient Rome – Take Out Food!

An ancient form of a take-out restaurant, the thermopolium was an outdoor service counter that offered ready to eat food

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Child Soldiers and Five Other Forgotten WW1 Facts

While WW2 was the deadliest and most cruel war in history of mankind, WW1 carries its own weight

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The Tradition and Rituals of the Inuit People

The Inuit people have a long tradition of oral literature and storytelling. Before they had a writing system, they passed stories from one generation to another

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Weird Ancient Greece Medical Treatments

People in Ancient Greece regarded illness as a divine punishment, while healing was quite literally a gift from the Gods

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Remembering the last time Mount Agung erupted

The November 2017 eruption came more than 50 years since the last eruption of the volcano. Back then, the authorities were not as prepared

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Unsung Heroes of World War II - Georg Ferdinand Duckwitz

Working as an attache in Denmark during World War II, Duckwitz managed to help 95% of the Jewish population avoid deportation

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Three Ancient Roman Hygiene Habits that Will Surprise You

A closer look on the daily life of the Romans leave us amazed and surprised. It is just impossible to explain how such advanced civilization had such poor habits.

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6 New and Interesting Facts about Kennedy Assassination

The Kennedy assassination happened on November 22, 1963. The former president drove through the streets of Dallas at 12:30 local time, at which point he was shot in the head

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Fun Television History Facts You Need to Know

John Bogie Baird is widely regarded as the brain behind the television. He is credited as the inventor of television. There were other pioneers in the field, like Paul Nipkow, Boris Rosing, Philio Far...

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Shocking Sex Rituals that Existed in Europe

Rarely, if ever, Europe comes to mind as a continent where some sex rituals and shocking sex practices were the norm

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Iwo Jima, More than just an Influential Photograph

The iconic photograph was taken by Joe Rosenthal and immediately become popular. But Iwo Jima represents much more for American history than just a photograph

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Secrets of Auschwitz – What you don’t know about the infamous Death Camp

The camp has become a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and is home of the state museum that attracts more than 1 million visitors per year

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Japanese Samurai Warriors – 7 Facts You Need to Know

Samurai were noble warriors fighting evil and defending the country and lived by their moral code, the "bushido"

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Alfred Jewel – A priceless piece of jewelry

The jewel is about 2.5 inches long and shows an image of a man. Many believe that is Jesus Christ or St Neot or St Cuthbert

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Coca Cola Vault: Where is the Secret Formula kept?

The World of Coca COla museum is home of the high-tech vault that holds the original recipe. The museum is a 20-acre complex located across Baker Street

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26 Delicious Chocolate Facts You Should Know

Chocolate was first invented by the Aztecs, who made chocolate from ground cacao seeds. They added seasonings so that they can product spicy and frothy drink

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Christ the Redeemer Quick Facts

Christ the Redeemer is 98ft tall, and that is without the 26ft pedestal. The arms of Christ stretch for 92ft wide. The statue weighs 635 metric tons. Located at the peak of 2,300ft Corcovado Mountain,...

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Frances Folsom Cleveland: The Woman that Popularized the term “First Lady”

Frances was very unconventional and unique in her own way. The press and especially the Women’s Christian Temperance Union despised her “décolleté gowns”. They thought it was provocative and d...

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Month of Women – Valentina Tereshkova

In June 1963, Valentina orbited Earth 48 times, spent almost three days in space in Volstok 6, and she exchanged communications with another spacecraft

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Belle Gunness – The True Black Widow of the Midwest

Belle was a serial killer who killed between 25 and 40 people from 1884 to 1908 before disappearing without a trace

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Top 7 Enlightening Latin phrases we use daily

Latin is a dead language, nobody uses it in modern times. But there was a time when Latin was used to educate the masses

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15 Facts about Zeus from Greek Mythology

In Greek mythology, Zeus is sometimes portrayed as the rain god. Homer believed that the Gods live at Olympus, the highest mountain in Greece which is perfect for a “weather god”

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Buzludzha Monument – Abandoned UFO Cold War Monument

The cost of the building process was 14,186,000 leva, which equals to $35 million in today’s rates. The monument was opened on August 23, 1981. Todor Zhivkov announced the opening at the ceremony

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America’s First Ladies: Fun Facts you didn’t know

The First Lady needs to be respectable, presentable, smart, intelligent, and so on. So far, America has had some great First ladies

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Benjamin Franklin the Inventor

Between running a print shop, starting the first lending library in America, engineering the postal system, and helping America during the Revolution, he found time to draw up many devices

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The Mystery of Oak Island? Is there something there?

The privately owned island has much more to offer, but the most famous spot is the location now known as “the Money Pit”

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The most popular American Presidential Dogs

In the wake of Donald Trump becoming a President and waiting for his pet, we remember some of the dogs that lived in the White House

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The long history of Route 66

From Illinois, through Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, the route ends in California. On the current map of America, you cannot find Route 66, as the road is the only national highway to be decommissione...

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Top 5 Female Warriors you need to Know

History often forgets about them, but the reality is that there have been as many legendary female warriors as male

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How Spartan boys were turned into mighty warriors

There is a reason why Sparta was one of the most powerful cities in Ancient Greece, and it all came down to their army

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Top 10 Most Influential Women in Roman History

They might not have been Catherine the Great, but they were more than just expansion of their husband.

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Greek Architecture that changed History

The influence of Greek architecture is visible in Roman architecture later. During the Renaissance period, Ancient Greek architecture was rediscovered, but the legacy of Greece goes deeper

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5 Victorian Etiquette Rules that Changed Society we live in

The Victorian era lasted from the 1830s to the 1900s and was named after queen Victoria’s reign

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Sikes-Picot Agreement - 100 years later

The Sykes-Picot agreement was a secret agreement back then, signed between France and the United Kingdom, with the Russian Empire backing it up. The trio of countries won the War, divided the countrie...

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Remembering Arno Breker, creator of Nazi Architecture

Breker was tasked with the development of fascist aesthetics, and his bombastic sculptures were the norm during the Third Reich reign, and even afterwards

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Whitney plantation museum - America's Auschwitz

The grounds of the museum contain exhibits, as well as art works and original, life-size sculptures of children that are there to symbolize all the children who lost their life in the era of slavery

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Top 10 Controversial Roman Emperors

What makes the following emperors controversial is their desire to suppress the Senate, and their flamboyant lifestyle

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Top 10 Ancient Greece Poets You Need to Know

Ancient Greek literature influenced the Latin Literature first and foremost, and then the European literature until the 18th century.

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